Category rogers

Image for Guest Blog: National Capital Freenet (NCF) is “still fighting for change after 30 years”

Guest Blog: National Capital Freenet (NCF) is “still fighting for change after 30 years”

Minister Champagne’s refusal to revisit the CRTC’s Internet price hikes has hurt independent providers’ efforts to close the digital divide.
Image for DEBUNKED! Did Minister Champagne actually stop the Rogers-Shaw buyout?

DEBUNKED! Did Minister Champagne actually stop the Rogers-Shaw buyout?

Or did he approve it? The truth is: Champagne rubber stamped the affordability-crushing deal. Here’s how he pulled off the sleight of hand.
Image for Minister Champagne’s 3 Simple Steps to Collapsing Internet Competition in Canada

Minister Champagne’s 3 Simple Steps to Collapsing Internet Competition in Canada

Our “Minister of Collapse” must undo this affordability disaster of his own making.
Image for Thousands tell CRTC to oppose new hidden fee on cell phone and Internet bills

Thousands tell CRTC to oppose new hidden fee on cell phone and Internet bills

Today’s the last day to add your voice to the public record against Telus’s new credit card processing fee.
Image for Another nationwide telecom outage is bound to happen. Here’s why.

Another nationwide telecom outage is bound to happen. Here’s why.

It’s time to end Big Telecom’s monopoly over our networks and finally bring affordable connectivity to Canada. This is how we do it.
Image for What is the CRTC? And why should I care?

What is the CRTC? And why should I care?

Laying out what the CRTC is and how it affects the daily life of Canadians.
Image for Your voice, DELIVERED: OpenMedia’s latest petition to stop Rogers from buying Shaw is in!

Your voice, DELIVERED: OpenMedia’s latest petition to stop Rogers from buying Shaw is in!

To date, the OpenMedia community has called on the government a whopping 34,700+ times to block Rogers-Shaw. Talk about a deafening response!
Image for Rogers-Shaw: Taking your voices to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

Rogers-Shaw: Taking your voices to the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage

On February 16, we told the committee in no uncertain terms: the Rogers-Shaw merger is detrimental for Canada.
Image for “Family of raccoons” leading OpenMedia poll to replace Rogers family as Canada’s supreme telecom dynasty

“Family of raccoons” leading OpenMedia poll to replace Rogers family as Canada’s supreme telecom dynasty

VOTE NOW! If a single telecom dynasty is going to rule us all, let’s pick a better one than the Rogers family.
Image for The fight against the Rogers-Shaw buyout isn’t over

The fight against the Rogers-Shaw buyout isn’t over

In March 2021, Rogers made a shocking announcement: It’s set to buy out Shaw, Canada’s fourth Big Telecom provider.
Image for It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

Why do people in Canada still pay some of the most expensive cell phone bills in the industrialized world? Here's how it all went down, where we are now, and where to next:
Image for Affordable data: 8,015 of your comments on the public record!

Affordable data: 8,015 of your comments on the public record!

Your response to the CRTC asking for what a fair price for data looks like
Image for Could Canadians finally get relief from high wireless prices?

Could Canadians finally get relief from high wireless prices?

Exorbitant wireless prices have been the norm for Canadians for too long, but an encouraging shift in policy could be about to change that.
Image for Innovation Minister asks CRTC to reconsider opening Canada’s wireless market to affordable wi-fi based mobile providers

Innovation Minister asks CRTC to reconsider opening Canada’s wireless market to affordable wi-fi based mobile providers

Minister Bains' announcement is good news for Canadian consumers, who have long been in need of relief from cell phone bills that are far too high.
Image for Consumer advocates highlight industry support for ending data caps and upholding Net Neutrality in CRTC consultation

Consumer advocates highlight industry support for ending data caps and upholding Net Neutrality in CRTC consultation

Rogers’ opposition to zero-rating and moves by U.S. firms Netflix and T-Mobile suggest Canadian telecoms should follow their lead and offer unlimited data plans 
Image for Cell phone bills already going up as Bell-MTS takeover awaits approval

Cell phone bills already going up as Bell-MTS takeover awaits approval

Two weeks after Bell announced their intentions to take over Manitoba’s fourth carrier, Rogers has raised rates.
Image for Rogers releases third annual transparency report

Rogers releases third annual transparency report

Encouraging to see Rogers shed a light on the company’s disclosure of subscriber information to law enforcement and challenge ‘tower dumps’ in court. We hope to see other big telecoms take on similar transparency initiatives.
Image for The CRTC now knows 45,000 Canadians stand with innovative new wireless providers

The CRTC now knows 45,000 Canadians stand with innovative new wireless providers

But, will they let Rogers kill a brand new cell phone provider?
Image for Can a successful regional mobile provider go national? Not in Canada.

Can a successful regional mobile provider go national? Not in Canada.

At least, not if telecom giants Rogers and Bell get their way.
Image for Why is Rogers trying to kill a brand new $19 per month cell provider?

Why is Rogers trying to kill a brand new $19 per month cell provider?

They’re at it again: telecom giants Rogers and Bell are trying to crush an innovative, affordable mobile provider. We’re taking this to the CRTC, and we need you to stand with us.

Big Telecom are raising wireless prices, again

What's wireless worth in Canada? Our own Josh Tabish was at CBC's The Exchange yesterday explaining why we can't compare the value of a mobile phone to that of a cup of coffee, like Rogers CEO suggests.
Image for Important precedent for cell phone privacy in Canada set in landmark ruling

Important precedent for cell phone privacy in Canada set in landmark ruling

Police request for “tower dump” of user data from over 40,000 Rogers and Telus customers ruled a violation of privacy rights, and lays important groundwork for battling other privacy violations, including StingRay technologies and Bill C-51.  
Image for Rogers is officially approved to take control of Mobilicity

Rogers is officially approved to take control of Mobilicity

This will mean fewer choices for Canadian cell phone subscribers when wireless prices are already increasing at 3 times the rate of inflation.  Speak out now at http://openmedia.ca/gatekeepers Article by Ian Hardy for Mobile Syrup Rogers announced today it has received all governmental, creditor and court approvals to officially acquire Mobilicity’s spectrum and subscriber base, as well as Shaw’s AWS spectrum.
Image for Globe and Mail: More power to the Big Three, less choice to Canadians

Globe and Mail: More power to the Big Three, less choice to Canadians

The new Rogers/Mobilicity deal will mean less choice and therefore higher prices. Article by Christine Dobby for The Globe and Mail While Mobilicity has finally found a buyer – selling to Rogers Communications Inc. for $465-million after more than two years in legal and financial limbo – Wind Mobile Corp. will also benefit from the deal through a significant increase in its spectrum holdings.
Image for Cellphone Freedom Day! On June 3 you’ll be able to end your 3-year-contract for free

Cellphone Freedom Day! On June 3 you’ll be able to end your 3-year-contract for free

Starting June 3, three year contracts which have run or 24 months or more can be cancelled without any penalties. Together, we helped make this code of conduct happen by developing our crowdsourced action plan for the future of our wireless market.

Ben Klass on wireless carriers’ high prices

As cell phone customers reel from yet another Big Telecom price hike, it seems like our wireless market is moving backwards not forwards. Telecom expert and OpenMedia community member Ben Klass asks what will it take for Canadians to get the greater choice and lower prices we deserve. Article from Ben Klass' blog Last week, Mobile Syrup reported that the big 3′s flanker brands, Virgin, Fido, and Koodo (including zombified competitor Public Mobile) would be raising prices on their wireless plans at the same time.

Rogers hits senior with an $800 bill for Internet she never used

Rogers hit this B.C. senior with a whopping $800 bill for Internet she never even used. It seems not a week goes by without another story of Big Telecom price-gouging. Tell us yours in the comments below. Article from CBC News A senior citizen in Chilliwack, B.C., is angry about an $800 wireless internet access bill from Rogers — a bill she claims she's not responsible for. Darlene Davies, 65, usually pays $60 a month for her Rogers internet service, which she accesses with an unsecured Rocket hub Wi-Fi hotspot access point. When she received a bill for more than $600 instead, she was stunned. Rogers customer service told her the charges stemmed from data used to download movies, stream TV shows and play online games. But Davies says she doesn't even know how to do any of those things.
Image for Should Rogers be allowed to block us from watching Hockey Night online?

Should Rogers be allowed to block us from watching Hockey Night online?

Big Telecom is running scared of cord-cutters - and is doing what it takes to block them from watching their favourite shows online. It looks like Rogers is even planning to block Canadians from watching Hockey Night online. They want to trap Canadians in expensive and outdated service plans - and they’re using their power and control to do so. It’s not too late to push back by telling decision-makers at the CRTC to put Canadians first when it comes to our digital future. Have you cut the cord from your television service recently - or are you considering it? If so, you’ve probably noticed it’s getting more difficult to watch the content you want online. The reason is clear - Big Telecom is terrified of cord-cutters and is determined to do what it takes to trap Canadians in their expensive TV service plans.

Rogers may be pulling out of the CWTA

It looks like Big Telecom's lobby group is in deep trouble. Last week Telus pulled out of the CWTA - now Rogers could be poised to do the same. Will you be shedding tears over its demise? http://bit.ly/NVDvuc Article by Gary Ng for iPhone in Canada Last week in a surprise move Telus pulled out of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA), a wireless lobby group which earlier saw Wind Mobile, Public Mobile and Mobilicity withdraw its membership as well. The future of the CWTA could be in jeopardy depending on how you look into comments made by Rogers, reports The Canadian Press. When asked whether Rogers would remain within the CWTA, spokesperson Patricia Trott said on Friday “We’ve been reviewing our options and we’ll make a decision that’s right for our customers.” Does that mean a yes or a no?

Financial Post: Industry Minister Moore blocks Bell and Rogers from obtaining Nextwave’s wireless spectrum

Ottawa has blocked telecom giants Bell and Rogers from gobbling up even more scarce and valuable wireless spectrum. Let's keep up the pressure on Industry Minister Moore to rein in Big Telecom at https://openmedia.ca/gatekeepers Article by Christine Dobby for Financial Post TORONTO – Ottawa has blocked a bid by two of Canada’s largest wireless carriers to scoop up more cellular airwaves, taking the opportunity again to drive home its policy on the industry.
Image for Huffington Post: Rogers accused of charging for internal Internet traffic

Huffington Post: Rogers accused of charging for internal Internet traffic

"Outright theft." That's what Canadians are calling this latest alleged attempt by Big Telecom to price-gouge us. Speak out against Big Telecom price-gouging at https://openmedia.ca/deadweight Article by Daniel Tencer for the Huffington Post Canada Rogers Communications is denying online accusations that it charges its internet customers for internal traffic on their routers, even if that traffic doesn’t use the Rogers network.

National Post: Christine Dobby looks back at Canada’s telecom war of 2013

The National Post's Christine Dobby looks back at Big Telecom's efforts last year to limit your telecom choice. We know Big Telecom are gearing up for a huge fight in 2014 as they try to keep your bills sky-high. Article by Christine Dobby for the National Post Last summer a simmering dispute over obscure regulations boiled over into all-out war as the country’s cellphone titans took on the federal government and its efforts to entice a U.S. giant north. The dialogue got heated as the three largest wireless carriers – ostensible rivals – joined forces to target Ottawa’s policy on the industry. They waged a co-ordinated public relations campaign with troops of executives touring newsrooms to get the message out. They flooded the airwaves with radio ads, launched a website and helped boost the newspaper industry with a barrage of full-page ads about the U.S. threat and Ottawa’s betrayal, each one more dire than the next.
Image for The Globe & Mail: Rogers and Bell to purchase majority stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment

The Globe & Mail: Rogers and Bell to purchase majority stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment

Two of Canada's biggest media conglomerates, Bell and Rogers, are partnering up. Their goal? To take control of the iconic Maple Leaf Sports & Entertainment group. The CRTC approved the deal yesterday, which includes three TV channels, several sports teams, and even some real estate holdings. With the CRTC giving Big Telecom their blessing for the purchase by saying that 'consumer safeguards' are in place, attention now turns to the impending Bell takeover of Astral to be reviewed next month. Let the CRTC know that Big Telecom's power grab needs to be stopped. Share our Action Plan for a Connected Canada at http://openmedia.ca/plan/action-plan and stay tuned for future updates. Article by Rita Trichur for The Globe & Mail Canada’s broadcast regulator has given its blessing to a $1.3-billion agreement by BCE Inc. and Rogers Communications Inc. to purchase a majority stake in Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Ltd. While that paves the way for the two rivals to take control of the iconic sports company, the real test of consumer safeguards will come next month, when the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission scrutinizes BCE’s $3.38-billion proposed takeover of Astral Media Inc.
Image for TorrentFreak.com: New data exposes Canadian ISPs throttling download speeds

TorrentFreak.com: New data exposes Canadian ISPs throttling download speeds

Canadian citizens are paying for Internet access, but Big Telecom isn't being completely open about the restrictions that they've been imposing. With new data just published by the Measurement Lab, Canadian service providers such as Bell and Rogers have been exposed as interfering with over 75% of torrent transfers and download speeds. The CRTC confronted Rogers about bandwidth throttling late last year, to which Rogers responded with a promise that they would end interference by the end of this year. Although Bell has made a similar promise to their consumers as well, it doesn't seem like we're seeing any changes just yet. If you've experienced any throttling issues with your provider, tell us about it in the comments below. To make the switch from Big Telecom to an independent ISP, visit our campaign page at http://openmedia.ca/switch. Article by Ernesto at TorrentFreak.com New data published by the Google-backed Measurement Lab gives a unique insight into the BitTorrent throttling practices of ISPs all over the world. In the U.S. and Australia most large ISPs limit less than 10 percent of BitTorrent transfers. In the UK and Canada on the other hand, some providers interfere with up to three-quarters of all BitTorrent traffic.
Image for The Globe & Mail: Rogers says defence of false advertising case a ‘slam dunk’

The Globe & Mail: Rogers says defence of false advertising case a ‘slam dunk’

Last week we shared how Rogers is trying to seek court approval for using false advertising in their campaigns. By claiming 'fewer dropped calls' without the requisite data and testing, Rogers is now faced with a $10M fine by the Competition Bureau. In opening remarks to the trial made late last week, Rogers' lead lawyer issued a bold statement in saying that their case is a 'slam dunk'. With the Competition Bureau countering that testing was limited to a few select cities, conducted internally and produced a marginal difference in results to their competitors – it doesn't seem like the case is closed just yet. Article by Jeff Gray for The Globe & Mail Rogers Communications Inc. came out swinging in a Toronto courtroom on Thursday, saying the false advertising allegations from the federal Competition Bureau over the company’s “fewer dropped calls” claims are “completely without merit.”
Image for CBC: Rogers contracts push the envelope, lawyer says

CBC: Rogers contracts push the envelope, lawyer says

Rogers costumers in fixed-term contracts have no choice but to accept rate hikes or pay steep fees to end their contract. Does this seem fair to you? If you are sick of telecom price-gouging, take action by signing our Stop the Squeeze petition and make the switch to an indy ISP. From CBC News: Some of the conditions that Rogers Communications imposes on customers in fixed-term contracts are legally questionable, according to an expert at the University of Ottawa. At issue is the company's practice of boosting service rates for things such as high-speed internet, home phone and cable TV, leaving some customers in fixed-term contracts in the unenviable position of either accepting the new prices or paying expensive fees to end their contract.

Rogers LTE and 4G: Beyond Sales Puffery?

This blog post comes courtesy of Mike Fujimoto, a summer intern of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC). I hope to add occasional pieces on the open Internet from a telecom-regulatory-consumer-advocate perspective and not to make them too dull. Thanks, John Lawford, Counsel, PIAC Rogers LTE and 4G: Beyond Sales Puffery? In July 2011, Rogers announced the launch of its Long Term Evolution (LTE) network providing the Ottawa-area with access to the fastest wireless internet in Canada, eclipsing the performance of their competitors' HSPA+ networks. Although estimates vary significantly, Rob Bruce (President of Rogers' communications division), pegged the new network at four to five times faster than existing networks in an interview quoted by The Globe and Mail's Iain Marlow.[1] However, the launch of their new network has presented a marketing problem for Rogers since they had already followed the lead of their rivals in labelling their HSPA+ network as a '4G' (fourth-generation) network. In order to "differentiate" their new LTE service, Rogers has opted to market it as "Beyond 4G" in their web advertising and on their website although their LTE network is incapable of reaching speeds 'beyond' the upper limits of what can be considered '4G' (speeds which are currently only being reached in laboratory-settings).

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