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Big Telecom tried to scare Wall Street into supporting the Internet slow lane. Here's why Wall Street isn't buying.

Article by Mike Masnick for TechDirt

A few weeks ago, after it was more or less confirmed that the FCC was going forward with full Title II reclassification of broadband, we noted that the stocks of the big broadband companiesactually went up suggesting that Wall Street actually knows that reclassification won't really impact broadband companies, despite what they've been saying publicly. Perhaps this is partly because those same companies have been telling Wall Street that the rule change won't have an impact.

More good news from yesterday's landmark FCC ruling.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to preempt state laws in North Carolina and Tennessee that prevent municipal broadband providers from expanding outside their territories.

Why yesterday's big net neutrality win shows that people power can create change.

Article by Tim Wu for The New Yorker

Today, the Federal Communications Commission, by a vote of three to two, enacted its strongest-ever rules on net neutrality, preserving an open Internet by prohibiting broadband providers from blocking or slowing content that flows across their pipes. It is a substantial achievement for the Obama Administration and the F.C.C. chairman Tom Wheeler, and also for the many groups that fought hard for the outcome. But it also is a moment to reflect back on the process over the last year that led here, and figure out why what so many people thought they knew turned out to be wrong.

Here's a great recap of the big net neutrality win yesterday. If you haven't had a chance yet, go to https://stoptheslowdown.net to share your victory message and celebrate with thousands of Internet users.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to enforce net neutrality rules that prevent Internet providers—including cellular carriers—from blocking or throttling traffic or giving priority to Web services in exchange for payment.

Well, Internet, we did it. Today, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission announced the strongest Net Neutrality rules possible. Experts everywhere agree that the new rules will entrench net neutrality and prevent telecom conglomerates from creating ‘slow lanes’ on the Internet.

Here’s the bottom line: This is a historic victory for the Internet and for Internet users everywhere. The telecom companies were looking for the legal tools to squeeze every last cent out of every last Internet user. But today, they lost those tools. This is because millions of Internet users, hundreds of tech companies, and dozens of public interest groups stayed vigilant for over a year.

The rules came after a massive, year-long campaign involving over 5 million people from across the U.S. and around the globe – many of whom spoke out through our campaign at https://StopTheSlowDown.net (which, as of this morning, we turned into a ‘VICTORY!’ landing page to celebrate the Internet’s big win). It’s been incredible to see how this campaign brought together an inspiring coalition of open Internet groups, public interest groups, civil rights organizations, and web companies.

We did it! Today, the FCC announced that it would not allow Big Telecom to create Internet slow lanes, and would preserve real net neutrality. Go to StopTheSlowdown.net to celebrate!

You can also share this historic win on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

February 26, 2015 – The Federal Communications Commission has just announced strong new Net Neutrality rules. Experts say the new rules will entrench net neutrality and prevent telecom conglomerates from creating ‘slow lanes’ on the Internet.

The rules came after a massive, year-long grassroots campaign involving over 5 million people from across the U.S. and around the globe. The campaign was organized by an inspiring coalition of open Internet groups, public interest groups, civil rights organizations and web companies.

Internet freedom organization OpenMedia, which yesterday parked a giant Jumbotron opposite the FCC to stream thousands of citizen comments, is hailing the FCC’s announcement as a landmark win for Internet users everywhere.

You know that old expression, “A picture is worth 30,000 people submitting images, videos, and messages to an 11’ x 17’ JUMBOTRON in Washington, D.C.”? OK, it’s not really a saying… yet. But it might be after today!

THE PRO-INTERNET JUMBOTRON IS LIVE AT FCC HEADQUARTERS IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

And there’s still a chance for you to get your message on it! If you haven’t already, submit an image or message at https://StopTheSlowDown.net and we’ll do our best to make sure it finds its way onto it. And be sure to share it on Facebook and Twitter.

You can see the first half of our JUMBOTRON reel here, created by over 30,000 Internet users from around the globe speaking out:

February 25, 2015 – When staff at the FCC look out the window today, they’ll see the Internet looking right back at them. In advance of tomorrow’s crucial FCC Net Neutrality decision, OpenMedia and a huge Internet freedom coalition are parking a giant Jumbotron opposite the agency’s headquarters in Washington D.C. The Jumbotron will be streaming images, messages, videos, and memes submitted by tens of thousands of Internet users via an online tool at StopTheSlowdown.net.

The FCC is poised to decide whether to allow telecom companies to create slow lanes on the Internet. The Jumbotron will be part of a range of activity outside the FCC building, as Internet freedom advocates gather from all over the U.S. and the globe. Over five million people, including President Obama, have called on the FCC to defend real Net Neutrality. Comments made by FCC chair Tom Wheeler earlier this month prompted cautious optimism from open Internet advocates.

Etsy CEO Chad Dickerson sounds off on why he and millions of other Internet users depend on net neutrality.

Article by Chad Dickerson for Medium

I love the Internet. It has powered my career, the company I lead—
Etsy—and our community of users. The truth is that a free and open Internet matters to a lot of us. And that’s why I’m so happy to see FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler taking action this week to protect it. If the Internet hadn’t been so wide open to newcomers, it’s unlikely I would have ended up where I am today.

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