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The NSA's hissy fit over increasing cell phone encryption continues apace. What about you? Do you use encryption? Let us know in the comments.

Article by Joshua Kopstein for Motherboard

The NSA is not thrilled about the fact that encrypted communications are becoming easier and more widespread than ever before. Its director, Admiral Mike Rogers, said as much last week during a cybersecurity event in Washington, D.C., where he joined the FBI in asking for a “legal framework” by which government agencies can insert backdoors into commonly used communications software.

In Canada, a new law threatens to introduce a secret police force and drastically reduce privacy rights. We're fighting back: https://openmedia.org/spyonus

Article by John Barber for The Guardian

More than 100 Canadian law professors have warned the prime minister, Stephen Harper, that a sweeping new anti-terror law introduced by his Conservative government is a “dangerous piece of legislation” that threatens to undermine the rule of law, human rights and democracy itself.

Big Telecom is ready to throw a hissy fit over the recent net neutrality ruling. Here's why you shouldn't freak out.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission chairman is expecting lawsuits challenging the FCC's net neutrality order, but is confident that this time the rules will survive.

Big Telecom tried to scare Wall Street into supporting the Internet slow lane. Here's why Wall Street isn't buying.

Article by Mike Masnick for TechDirt

A few weeks ago, after it was more or less confirmed that the FCC was going forward with full Title II reclassification of broadband, we noted that the stocks of the big broadband companiesactually went up suggesting that Wall Street actually knows that reclassification won't really impact broadband companies, despite what they've been saying publicly. Perhaps this is partly because those same companies have been telling Wall Street that the rule change won't have an impact.

More good news from yesterday's landmark FCC ruling.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to preempt state laws in North Carolina and Tennessee that prevent municipal broadband providers from expanding outside their territories.

Why yesterday's big net neutrality win shows that people power can create change.

Article by Tim Wu for The New Yorker

Today, the Federal Communications Commission, by a vote of three to two, enacted its strongest-ever rules on net neutrality, preserving an open Internet by prohibiting broadband providers from blocking or slowing content that flows across their pipes. It is a substantial achievement for the Obama Administration and the F.C.C. chairman Tom Wheeler, and also for the many groups that fought hard for the outcome. But it also is a moment to reflect back on the process over the last year that led here, and figure out why what so many people thought they knew turned out to be wrong.

Here's a great recap of the big net neutrality win yesterday. If you haven't had a chance yet, go to https://stoptheslowdown.net to share your victory message and celebrate with thousands of Internet users.

Article by Jon Brodkin for Ars Technica

The Federal Communications Commission today voted to enforce net neutrality rules that prevent Internet providers—including cellular carriers—from blocking or throttling traffic or giving priority to Web services in exchange for payment.

Well, Internet, we did it. Today, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission announced the strongest Net Neutrality rules possible. Experts everywhere agree that the new rules will entrench net neutrality and prevent telecom conglomerates from creating ‘slow lanes’ on the Internet.

Here’s the bottom line: This is a historic victory for the Internet and for Internet users everywhere. The telecom companies were looking for the legal tools to squeeze every last cent out of every last Internet user. But today, they lost those tools. This is because millions of Internet users, hundreds of tech companies, and dozens of public interest groups stayed vigilant for over a year.

The rules came after a massive, year-long campaign involving over 5 million people from across the U.S. and around the globe – many of whom spoke out through our campaign at https://StopTheSlowDown.net (which, as of this morning, we turned into a ‘VICTORY!’ landing page to celebrate the Internet’s big win). It’s been incredible to see how this campaign brought together an inspiring coalition of open Internet groups, public interest groups, civil rights organizations, and web companies.

We did it! Today, the FCC announced that it would not allow Big Telecom to create Internet slow lanes, and would preserve real net neutrality. Go to StopTheSlowdown.net to celebrate!

You can also share this historic win on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+

February 26, 2015 – The Federal Communications Commission has just announced strong new Net Neutrality rules. Experts say the new rules will entrench net neutrality and prevent telecom conglomerates from creating ‘slow lanes’ on the Internet.

The rules came after a massive, year-long grassroots campaign involving over 5 million people from across the U.S. and around the globe. The campaign was organized by an inspiring coalition of open Internet groups, public interest groups, civil rights organizations and web companies.

Internet freedom organization OpenMedia, which yesterday parked a giant Jumbotron opposite the FCC to stream thousands of citizen comments, is hailing the FCC’s announcement as a landmark win for Internet users everywhere.

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