Category telus

Image for Minister Champagne’s 3 Simple Steps to Collapsing Internet Competition in Canada

Minister Champagne’s 3 Simple Steps to Collapsing Internet Competition in Canada

Our “Minister of Collapse” must undo this affordability disaster of his own making.
Image for Mapping the Data Broker Economy (Blog 3): Telus

Mapping the Data Broker Economy (Blog 3): Telus

In order to shine a light on the data broker economy, we’ve filed personal information requests to take back our data, and are exploring the privacy risks of data brokers.
Image for Thousands tell CRTC to oppose new hidden fee on cell phone and Internet bills

Thousands tell CRTC to oppose new hidden fee on cell phone and Internet bills

Today’s the last day to add your voice to the public record against Telus’s new credit card processing fee.
Image for Mapping the Data Broker Economy: Taking Back Our Data

Mapping the Data Broker Economy: Taking Back Our Data

In order to shine a light on the data broker economy, we’ve filed personal information requests to take back our data, and are exploring the privacy risks of data brokers.
Image for What is the CRTC? And why should I care?

What is the CRTC? And why should I care?

Laying out what the CRTC is and how it affects the daily life of Canadians.
Image for Our location data: What we know now

Our location data: What we know now

What we’ve learned one week into testimony about the government’s use of cell phone tracking during COVID-19.
Image for Our Location Data: Three Essential Questions for the Ethics Committee

Our Location Data: Three Essential Questions for the Ethics Committee

Parliament’s ethics committee is investigating the use of our location data by the federal government. Here are our top three questions we need answers to, and why.
Image for It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

Why do people in Canada still pay some of the most expensive cell phone bills in the industrialized world? Here's how it all went down, where we are now, and where to next:
Image for Affordable data: 8,015 of your comments on the public record!

Affordable data: 8,015 of your comments on the public record!

Your response to the CRTC asking for what a fair price for data looks like
Image for Telephone service in Kyuquot B.C. has been down for a week, failing intermittently for months, and unreliable for years

Telephone service in Kyuquot B.C. has been down for a week, failing intermittently for months, and unreliable for years

Despite repeated requests, residents are reporting Telus has failed to come to Kyuquot to fix the issues for over 2 months.
Image for Consumer advocates highlight industry support for ending data caps and upholding Net Neutrality in CRTC consultation

Consumer advocates highlight industry support for ending data caps and upholding Net Neutrality in CRTC consultation

Rogers’ opposition to zero-rating and moves by U.S. firms Netflix and T-Mobile suggest Canadian telecoms should follow their lead and offer unlimited data plans 
Image for Why are Telus and Bell fighting against ambitious speed targets?

Why are Telus and Bell fighting against ambitious speed targets?

At the CRTC’s broadband hearings, some ISPs are arguing internet speeds are fine. Those same companies deliver some of the slowest services to customers.

Big Telecom are raising wireless prices, again

What's wireless worth in Canada? Our own Josh Tabish was at CBC's The Exchange yesterday explaining why we can't compare the value of a mobile phone to that of a cup of coffee, like Rogers CEO suggests.
Image for Important precedent for cell phone privacy in Canada set in landmark ruling

Important precedent for cell phone privacy in Canada set in landmark ruling

Police request for “tower dump” of user data from over 40,000 Rogers and Telus customers ruled a violation of privacy rights, and lays important groundwork for battling other privacy violations, including StingRay technologies and Bill C-51.  
Image for Cellphone Freedom Day! On June 3 you’ll be able to end your 3-year-contract for free

Cellphone Freedom Day! On June 3 you’ll be able to end your 3-year-contract for free

Starting June 3, three year contracts which have run or 24 months or more can be cancelled without any penalties. Together, we helped make this code of conduct happen by developing our crowdsourced action plan for the future of our wireless market.

Ben Klass on wireless carriers’ high prices

As cell phone customers reel from yet another Big Telecom price hike, it seems like our wireless market is moving backwards not forwards. Telecom expert and OpenMedia community member Ben Klass asks what will it take for Canadians to get the greater choice and lower prices we deserve. Article from Ben Klass' blog Last week, Mobile Syrup reported that the big 3′s flanker brands, Virgin, Fido, and Koodo (including zombified competitor Public Mobile) would be raising prices on their wireless plans at the same time.

Rogers may be pulling out of the CWTA

It looks like Big Telecom's lobby group is in deep trouble. Last week Telus pulled out of the CWTA - now Rogers could be poised to do the same. Will you be shedding tears over its demise? http://bit.ly/NVDvuc Article by Gary Ng for iPhone in Canada Last week in a surprise move Telus pulled out of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association (CWTA), a wireless lobby group which earlier saw Wind Mobile, Public Mobile and Mobilicity withdraw its membership as well. The future of the CWTA could be in jeopardy depending on how you look into comments made by Rogers, reports The Canadian Press. When asked whether Rogers would remain within the CWTA, spokesperson Patricia Trott said on Friday “We’ve been reviewing our options and we’ll make a decision that’s right for our customers.” Does that mean a yes or a no?

National Post: Christine Dobby looks back at Canada’s telecom war of 2013

The National Post's Christine Dobby looks back at Big Telecom's efforts last year to limit your telecom choice. We know Big Telecom are gearing up for a huge fight in 2014 as they try to keep your bills sky-high. Article by Christine Dobby for the National Post Last summer a simmering dispute over obscure regulations boiled over into all-out war as the country’s cellphone titans took on the federal government and its efforts to entice a U.S. giant north. The dialogue got heated as the three largest wireless carriers – ostensible rivals – joined forces to target Ottawa’s policy on the industry. They waged a co-ordinated public relations campaign with troops of executives touring newsrooms to get the message out. They flooded the airwaves with radio ads, launched a website and helped boost the newspaper industry with a barrage of full-page ads about the U.S. threat and Ottawa’s betrayal, each one more dire than the next.
Image for Bell raises prices, Telus furthers usage limits: Big Telecom is hurting the Internet

Bell raises prices, Telus furthers usage limits: Big Telecom is hurting the Internet

This week, Canadians learned that big telecom company Telus will be further limiting how much its customers can use the Internet. Soon after, we learned that big telecom company Bell will be jacking up their prices for Internet. After fighting for Internet openness and affordability for years, the pro-Internet community knows: this is price-gouging, pure and simple. It’s no secret that when it comes to the Internet, Canadians pay higher prices for worse services than people in most countries in the industrialized world. This is largely because a small handful of Big Telecom companies control upwards of 94% of the Internet service market in Canada, meaning that Canadians don’t have much real choice.
Image for Huffington Post: Telus introduces new Internet disservice

Huffington Post: Telus introduces new Internet disservice

Telus has announced plans to cut back on user bandwidth for its Internet service starting early next year. This Internet disservice comes after Telus met with OpenMedia to state that they were wanting to make amends with Canadians. Now is the time for Canadians to take action in making the switch to Distributel, TekSavvy or another independent ISP at OpenMedia.ca/Switch. Help us keep Big Telecom on their toes by making a contribution to OpenMedia at OpenMedia.ca/Allies. Article by Daniel Tencer for The Huffington Post Some Telus customers are upset after the phone and internet service company started sending out notifications that it is reducing upload and download limits on its home internet service. The change, which comes into effect on Feb. 1, 2013, affects only Telus customers who use the company’s land-line internet service, which is available in Alberta and British Columbia. Users of the Telus High-Speed service will see their upload and download cap reduced to 100 gigabytes per month from the current 150 gigabytes. Users of its highest-level service — Telus High Speed Turbo 25 — will see their download caps halved, to 250 gB from the current 500 gB. (A complete list of the new bandwidth caps is available at the Telus website.)
Image for You told us, we told them: A report-back from our meeting with Telus

You told us, we told them: A report-back from our meeting with Telus

When several senior representatives from Telus asked us to meet with them we knew immediately what we wanted the meeting to include: direct citizen stories about disrespectful and expensive cell phone service in Canada. This was clearly a unique opportunity to bring Canadian voices directly to executives running one of the big three cell phone giants. We shared a story from John, who was unexpectedly hit with a $300 bill from Telus after asking for a voice-only plan and unknowingly using expensive, metered data services. John quite effectively articulated the limited options facing customers: “What do I do to not pay this outrageous fee? Spend more hours on the phone? Spend thousands on legal fees to fight $300? Refuse to pay it, and have my credit rating dinged?” Reps from Telus discussed the various steps that they have taken to address these kinds of complaints. We highlighted some of the themes we’ve been hearing from you via Cell Phone Horror Stories, and on our Facebook wall: disrespectful customer service with unreasonable hold times; long contract lengths with expensive termination fees; false charges on your bills and a refusal to remove them; and high roaming fees in a context where cell phone service is already very expensive.
Image for Bringing Big Telecom down to earth: Help us create a new set of rules for Canada’s telecom giants

Bringing Big Telecom down to earth: Help us create a new set of rules for Canada’s telecom giants

If you had the chance – what would you say to the heads of Canada’s Big Telecom giants? It’s a tiring process trying to talk with someone – anyone – from within Big Telecom who seems to empathize with or understand Canadians. We’ve been a conduit for citizen concerns from the beginning with our StopTheMeter.ca campaign; and we’re still continuing on today with our call for Canadians to reshape our wireless market by sharing their CellPhoneHorrorStory.ca. We’ve been reading your horror stories and we know that you’re angry. We need new rules that apply to all Big Telecom companies equally – rules that are upheld and followed, instead of avoided. What should these rules be? Don’t just tell us, tell Telus.

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