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Image for Everything you need to know about data brokers

Everything you need to know about data brokers

For data brokers, being unseen is part of the strategy. So we’re shining a light on the dangerous economy of selling YOUR data.
Image for Need a break from the election? Here are some happy memories

Need a break from the election? Here are some happy memories

The past year has been a rollercoaster on the digital rights front. But together, the OpenMedia community has achieved a lot. Here’s an overview of our wins and what’s on the horizon.
Image for It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

It’s time to bring Canada’s wireless market out of the Stone Age — here’s how

Why do people in Canada still pay some of the most expensive cell phone bills in the industrialized world? Here's how it all went down, where we are now, and where to next:
Image for 72% of people in Canada support stronger privacy rules for political parties

72% of people in Canada support stronger privacy rules for political parties

A vast majority of Canadians support changing the law so that political parties follow the same privacy rules as private companies. But politicians remain keen to keep the exemptions that they have given themselves.
Image for Critics call Big Telecom’s low data plans ‘embarrassing’

Critics call Big Telecom’s low data plans ‘embarrassing’

"It's embarrassing and quite frankly it's rude to think that these are functional plans,"
Image for This Holiday Season Border Agents Have Your Privacy On Their Wish List

This Holiday Season Border Agents Have Your Privacy On Their Wish List

A concerning rise in phone searches this year comes to show Canadian and U.S. law essentially see no difference between searching your suitcase and searching your cell phone or laptop.
Image for Three ways NAFTA helps the powerful bend the rules

Three ways NAFTA helps the powerful bend the rules

Corporate greed has no limits. Time and time again we see the big and powerful seize every opportunity they can to suit their interests and trample ours, as in the case of NAFTA:
Image for Is your Internet data ending up in the NSA’s hands?

Is your Internet data ending up in the NSA’s hands?

Have you ever heard of Internet Exchanges? They are the physical places that ensure your data reliably makes it from point A to point B. But their physical nature and location also makes us more vulnerable to surveillance.
Image for EVENT: Join us this Feb 22 to learn more about your digital footprint

EVENT: Join us this Feb 22 to learn more about your digital footprint

How often do we stop to think about the digital breadcrumbs that get left behind in the wake of so much online activity?
Image for We’re taking action: Trump’s attack on Canadian privacy

We’re taking action: Trump’s attack on Canadian privacy

Trump’s recent attack on Canadian privacy has thrown Canadian data sharing agreements into the spotlight. We’re taking action with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada to ask for serious reconsideration of how Canadians should be protected from privacy violations in light of intrusive data sharing.
Image for Canada must urgently reassess data sharing with the U.S.

Canada must urgently reassess data sharing with the U.S.

President Trump's elimination of Privacy Act protections for foreigners calls for the Canadian government to immediately step up and assess what the impacts are of sharing our personal information with the U.S.
Image for What the heck is zero-rating and how does it undermine Net Neutrality?

What the heck is zero-rating and how does it undermine Net Neutrality?

The rise of a controversial practice called ‘zero-rating’ has Internet freedom advocates worried about the future of the open Web and innovation. Find out why.
Image for Huffington Post: Netflix exec says “Canadians have almost third-world access to the Internet”

Huffington Post: Netflix exec says “Canadians have almost third-world access to the Internet”

Big telecom companies across Canada are continuing to employ 'usage-based billing', an punitive billing practice that restricts data allowances. Though many of you fought back against UBB via the Stop The Meter campaign—you prevented it from being imposed across the entire Internet service market—Big Telecom continues to use it to price-gouge Canadians. Tell the CRTC that we want a full and comprehensive review of Big Telecom's Internet rates and hidden fees at PriceHike.ca. Together, we can put an end to this deceptive data pricing. A recent study suggests that some 10 per cent of Canadians now use the streaming video service Netflix. But the company evidently believes it could be doing better — and providing a better service to Canadians — were it not for Canada’s internet service providers. Article by Daniel Tencer for Huffington Post Canada “It’s almost a human rights violation what they’re charging for internet access in Canada,” Netflix Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos told a conference in Los Angeles last week, as quoted by GigaOM. “The problem in Canada is … they have almost third-world access to the internet,” he added in an interview a day later. At the heart of the matter for Netflix is "usage-based billing," or limiting the amount subscribers can download per month, a practice some Canadian ISPs put into place at roughly the same time that Netflix was preparing its move into the Canadian market. Some ISPs that already had caps lowered those limits in response to Netflix's arrival.

Rogers LTE and 4G: Beyond Sales Puffery?

This blog post comes courtesy of Mike Fujimoto, a summer intern of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC). I hope to add occasional pieces on the open Internet from a telecom-regulatory-consumer-advocate perspective and not to make them too dull. Thanks, John Lawford, Counsel, PIAC Rogers LTE and 4G: Beyond Sales Puffery? In July 2011, Rogers announced the launch of its Long Term Evolution (LTE) network providing the Ottawa-area with access to the fastest wireless internet in Canada, eclipsing the performance of their competitors' HSPA+ networks. Although estimates vary significantly, Rob Bruce (President of Rogers' communications division), pegged the new network at four to five times faster than existing networks in an interview quoted by The Globe and Mail's Iain Marlow.[1] However, the launch of their new network has presented a marketing problem for Rogers since they had already followed the lead of their rivals in labelling their HSPA+ network as a '4G' (fourth-generation) network. In order to "differentiate" their new LTE service, Rogers has opted to market it as "Beyond 4G" in their web advertising and on their website although their LTE network is incapable of reaching speeds 'beyond' the upper limits of what can be considered '4G' (speeds which are currently only being reached in laboratory-settings).

OpenMedia works to keep the Internet open, affordable, and surveillance-free. We create community-driven campaigns to engage, educate, and empower people to safeguard the Internet. Take action now

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