United States International Free Expression Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Free & Open Internet

WikiLeaks release of TPP Intellectual Property chapter confirms agreement threatens global Internet freedom

Confirmed: 20-year copyright term extensions, new rules that would induce ISPs to block websites, and criminal penalties for the circumvention of digital locks October 9, 2015 – This morning, WikiLeaks released the final version of the TPP’s Intellectual Property Chapter, just days after the 12 participating TPP countries finalized the agreement. Internet freedom group OpenMedia warns that the leak confirms Internet advocates greatest fears, including: new provisions that would induce Internet Service Providers to block websites without a court ruling, 20-year copyright term extensions, and new criminal penalties for the circumvention of digital locks. Reacting to the leak, OpenMedia’s Digital Rights Specialist Meghan Sali had this to say:

Confirmed: 20-year copyright term extensions, new rules that would induce ISPs to block websites, and criminal penalties for the circumvention of digital locks

October 9, 2015 This morning, WikiLeaks released the final version of the TPP’s Intellectual Property Chapter, just days after the 12 participating TPP countries finalized the agreement.

Internet freedom group OpenMedia warns that the leak confirms Internet advocates greatest fears, including: new provisions that would induce Internet Service Providers to block websites without a court ruling, 20-year copyright term extensions, and new criminal penalties for the circumvention of digital locks. Reacting to the leak, OpenMedia’s Digital Rights Specialist Meghan Sali had this to say:

“TPP countries are going to see their democratically-created laws over-written in favour of laws that benefit giant, media conglomerates and censor the Internet,” Sali said. “There’s no doubt that this will lead to an Internet that is more policed and expensive for users everywhere. They’ve traded away our digital future behind closed doors, after absolutely zero consultation.”

A statement released days ago by the New Zealand government, estimates the cost of copyright term extension for everyday New Zealanders at $55 million a year. Elsewhere, Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law Michael Geist suggests the cost to Canadians could be to the tune of hundreds of millions per year.

Throughout the TPP negotiations, OpenMedia has led a community of 3 million people opposing the TPP’s Internet censorship provisions, delivered citizen voices directly to TPP negotiators, led light projection demonstrations in Washington, DC, and initiated a dozens of other campaigns to raise awareness of the agreements extreme secrecy. The group is calling for the full text to be made available to as soon as possible.

 

About OpenMedia

OpenMedia is an award-winning community-based organization that safeguards the possibilities of the open Internet. We work toward informed and participatory digital policy by engaging hundreds of thousands of people in protecting our online rights.

Through campaigns such as StopTheMeter.ca and StopSpying.ca, OpenMedia has engaged over half-a-million Canadians, and has influenced public policy and federal law.

 

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Contact

Meghan Sali

Digital Rights Specialist, OpenMedia

1 (604) 363-7607

[email protected]

OpenMedia works to keep the Internet open, affordable, and surveillance-free. We create community-driven campaigns to engage, educate, and empower people to safeguard the Internet.

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