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Canada signs Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) in Chile

Despite suspending the most damaging provisions for the Internet, secrecy surrounding the deal's negotiations fail to provide government transparency or accountability.

March 8, 2018Today, leaders from 11 of the original signatories of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) signed a modified version of the original agreement now known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) in Chile.

The new deal contains a significantly improved intellectual property chapter, with the most problematic provisions, including copyright term extension, digital lock rules, and intermediary liability suspended. This appears to be largely due to pressure from the Canadian government, who were heavily influenced by public feedback in this area. Some ISDS provisions have also been suspended from the revised deal. However, the way in which the CPTPP was negotiated remains deeply flawed, as the process and negotiations were highly secretive and excluded the public.

“Although damaging provisions for the Internet have been suspended in this version of the TPP, it does not in any way change that this process was negotiated in secret, and designed with the interests of the U.S. – a country that is no longer even part of the agreement – at heart. The perpetual secretive and undemocratic framework under which the CPTPP has been negotiated is far from “progressive,” and continues to undermine citizens’ trust in our government and public institutions. Canadians have been demanding for transparency in the TPP since day one – when will the government listen?” said OpenMedia’s Executive Director Laura Tribe.

The deal will not take effect 60 days after it is ratified by at least six member countries. There are also discussions of the U.S. rejoining the deal down the line, in which case, changes to the current deal could be made and revive some of the worst provisions.

Canadians can continue to fight the TPP and demand a democratic and transparent trade process at: https://act.openmedia.org/killtheTPP

OpenMedia works to keep the Internet open, affordable, and surveillance-free. We create community-driven campaigns to engage, educate, and empower people to safeguard the Internet.

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