Category videotron

Image for DEBUNKED! Did Minister Champagne actually stop the Rogers-Shaw buyout?

DEBUNKED! Did Minister Champagne actually stop the Rogers-Shaw buyout?

Or did he approve it? The truth is: Champagne rubber stamped the affordability-crushing deal. Here’s how he pulled off the sleight of hand.
Image for Artists and Creators shouldn’t have to register with telecom giants to avoid censorship

Artists and Creators shouldn’t have to register with telecom giants to avoid censorship

We fight everyday to ensure a level playfield across our networks, but the threats to the open Internet we love keep coming. Here are some controversial Net Neutrality violations from around the globe you should know of.
Image for Big Telecom are trying to make the Internet like cable TV and we have to stop them

Big Telecom are trying to make the Internet like cable TV and we have to stop them

Last week, one of Canada’s Big Telecom giants announced a controversial new scheme that will give them more power to control how you use the Internet on your mobile devices – and, if we don’t speak up, the Big Three will soon follow suit. Videotron wants the power to hand-choose which mobile streaming apps and services are more expensive than others. How are they doing this? By bundling them into outdated Cable-TV-style packages for mobile phone users. As a result, they’re giving unfair advantage to the services they decide are “worthy” of our attention and discriminating against others – an anti-user practice that positions them as gatekeepers of our mobile networks, and violates Canada’s open Internet (AKA: Net Neutrality) rules.
Image for Arstechnica: Videotron provoking net neutrality fight with unlimited music

Arstechnica: Videotron provoking net neutrality fight with unlimited music

Instead of giving Big Telecom giants the power to choose which online apps and services are more expensive, why don't they treat all services equally? Let's put Canadians in the driver's seat – not these out of touch telecom giants. Article by Peter Nowak for Arstechnica Quebec wireless provider Videotron looks to be stepping into a net neutrality battle with a new unlimited music service that boasts “zero data usage.” But is the offer offside Canada’s fair internet rules? Unlike previous, similar situations involving the country’s wireless carriers, this one isn’t as cut and dried.

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