The Latest from Eva Prkachin

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This is what you have to say about Bill C-51

Canadians from coast to coast have been using our handy letter-to-the-editor tool to publish their thoughts on secret police Bill C-51. Here are some great examples of people who have spoken out. Stop promotion of a fear society - Midland Mirror Conservative MPs Patrick Brown, Kellie Leitch and Bruce Stanton have a duty and a responsibility to their constituents to consult, discuss and have the people decide the legitimacy of Bill C-51, the Anti-Terrorist Act, and whether the government should stop the promotion of a fear society.
Image for CJFE: C-51 will hurt free speech

CJFE: C-51 will hurt free speech

Secret police Bill C-51 must be scrapped to save free expression in Canada. Article by CJFE Open Letter to Prime Minister Harper: Bill C-51 cannot be salvaged; it must be scrapped Monday, April 13, 2015 The Right Honourable Stephen Harper, P.C., M.P., Prime Minister of Canada Office of the Prime Minister 80 Wellington Street Ottawa, ON K1A 0A2 Dear Prime Minister, We, the undersigned organizations and individuals, call for the immediate and unconditional dismissal of Bill C-51: Anti-Terrorism Act, 2015. We are extremely concerned by the potential impact of this legislation, which fails to strike the balance between protecting Canadians and safeguarding our cherished rights and freedoms as protected in the Charter.
Image for ZDNet: Fiber is changing the rural Internet landscape

ZDNet: Fiber is changing the rural Internet landscape

Rural communities are experiencing a boon in broadband speeds, thanks to increased choice in local providers. Article by Zack Whittaker for ZDNet Good news for Charlotte, NC! Google, the search engine you often go to during the day, has sufficiently scared your existing internet service enough into giving your faster speeds at no extra cost. It's the latest trend-setting move by the search giant, which aims to upend the rural internet-providing monopolies that are often the sole providers in one area.
Image for EFF: The fight against mass surveillance in Australia has just begun

EFF: The fight against mass surveillance in Australia has just begun

So mandatory data retention is a thing in Australia now, but here's why you shouldn't despair. Article by Eva Galperin for EFF Mandatory data retention legislation is never a good idea, which is why EFF has vigorously opposed it in the United States, where Congress tried and failed to pass it in 2009. That year, two ill-conceived bills would have required all Internet providers and operators of Wi-Fi access points to keep records on Internet users for at least two years to assist police investigations. Nevertheless, governments around the world, individually, and in concert, continue to argue that the stockpiling of the private, personal data of entire populations become a global norm. It's a constant battle, but one with some clear victories, most notably in the European Union, and most recently in Paraguay. The latest setback in the global fight against data retention has been in Australia, which, despite widespread opposition from journalists, activists and the general public, passed a comprehensive data retention bill this month.
Image for Vice: Canadians to the government: stop trying to make C-51 happen

Vice: Canadians to the government: stop trying to make C-51 happen

The more Canadians learn about secret police Bill C-51, the more they want the government to scrap it. That's why it's so important for you to join our final push to stop C-51 Article by Justin Ling for Vice As Stephen Harper's controversial anti-terrorism bill clips through Parliament, en route to becoming law by the summer, public opposition is threatening to take wind out of the prime minister's sails.
Image for India, Europe gear up for net neutrality fight

India, Europe gear up for net neutrality fight

Following recent successes in the fight against Internet slow lanes in North America, how is the global battle for net neutrality shaping up? Article by The New York Times The Federal Communications Commission recently adopted strong net neutrality rules that should prevent cable and phone companies from creating fast and slow lanes on the Internet. But policy makers in other parts of the world, particularly in Europe and India, are considering very different kinds of rules that could hurt consumers and start-up Internet businesses.
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5 simple steps to stop secret police Bill C-51

Challenge accepted? How far can you go to help stop reckless, dangerous, and ineffective secret police legislation, Bill C-51? Follow these five easy steps to get as many Canadians as possible to add their names to the growing petition against this unprecedented to our future.
Image for LA Times: What’s the rush?

LA Times: What’s the rush?

Copyright dinosaurs are getting on Congress's case to push through the secretive TPP. Article by Don Lee for the LA Times The U.S. entertainment industry is joining in a last-ditch push to sway wavering Democratic lawmakers to back President Obama's pro-trade agenda, as his hard-fought Pacific Rim trade deal heads to an uncertain end game
Image for PressProgress: The government just doesn’t get it on C-51

PressProgress: The government just doesn’t get it on C-51

We can't think of a time that we've seen Canadians from all political stripes so united. Tell the government to back down from secret police Bill C-51 at https://StopC51.ca  Article by PressProgress So much for consensus. The Conservatives appear set to ignore calls for greater, "independent" oversight of Bill C-51 -- the "near universal" recommendation made by witnesses to the House public safety committee.

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